Data Types in .NET Framework

Integral Numbers:

Integral numbers are whole numbers that do not have decimal values. For instance: 1, 12353, and –10. If you are familiar with computer programming, you’ll probably recognize the Byte, Short, Integer, and Long data types. These are 8, 16, 32, and 64-bit integers respectively, and each requires different amounts of memory. In other words, they can hold different ranges of values.
Such as- the Integer data type can hold values from –2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647.
Example:

dim A, B as Integer
dim C as Integer
A = 4
B= 6
C= A+B

Floating-Point Numbers:

Floating-point numbers are numbers with fractions or decimal points, such as 3.141592654 or –0.45. The specific data types are Single (System.Single, 4 bytes), Double (System.Double, 8 bytes), and Decimal (System.Decimal, 12 bytes).
Example:

dim X, Y as Single
dim Z as Single
X = 10.5
Y= 5.5
Z= X-Y

Strings:

The String data type that most programmers are familiar with is actually a class in VB.NET, rather than a primitive. This enables you to create new instances, override, and inherit from a String, which gives the programmer a lot of power when designing applications.
There is also the Char data type, which represents a single Unicode character because it is Unicode, it can represent a lot more than just the alphanumeric characters.

Dates:

The DateTime data type can be in many formats: “5/6/01,” “Wednesday, July 4th, 2001,” or “8:30:34 PM,” Such as- This provides you with great flexibility in representing your date values and enables you to perform simple arithmetic (such as adding or subtracting days or hours) on your values.

Booleans:

Booleans are simply true-or-false values, such as Yes / No, and so on. Although the Boolean data type in VB.NET strictly uses true/false to represent data, you can easily convert it to the other pairs of values.

Objects:

The Object data type is a generic type that’s used for a variable if no other type is specified.